Digital is focus for new editor at Globe & Mail

Click to watch John Stackhouse video

Yesterday’s executive changes at the Globe and Mail are being described as “part of a broader set of changes to expand the newspaper’s digital strategy.”

Few hints of what that might mean are being made public at this stage, but statements by publisher Phillip Crawley make it clear that he wants changes to happen quickly. And the man appointed to lead the paper’s newsroom says the paper could charge for its online news coverage.

As a result of the shakeup announced yesterday:

  • John Stackhouse [seen in the above video] becomes Editor-in-Chief, replacing Edward Greenspon, 52, who led the paper for seven years. Mr Stackhouse, 46, joined the paper 20 years ago, and has been editor of Report on Business since 2004.
  • Roger Dunbar, who has been Vice President of Digital and Business Development since joining the paper in 2004, becomes VP-Business Development and Marketing.
  • Angus Frame, 37, becomes VP-Digital. He was the editor of globeandmail.com for seven years before being named Group Director – Digital Media last year.

The changes were effective immediately.

According to the Globe’s own coverage today:

The publisher said it was time for The Globe to push further into new media, and at an accelerated pace. Mr. Stackhouse, who recently oversaw the relaunch of the Globe Investor websites along with Mr. Frame, will steer these projects.

“We’re not trying to make dramatic changes at this point in the way The Globe either looks or behaves. But I think there are certain internal things that need to happen. We need to be a bit quicker at making decisions,” Mr. Crawley said.

Leadership style was also behind the change, according to Mr Crawley, and the Canadian Press quotes the new Editor-in-Chief as saying he hopes to build more partnerships with others as he takes over the paper.

“The ways news organizations are changing requires a different kind of leadership,” he said.

“I think I work fairly well with diverse groups of people beyond the editorial department – that is other parts of the organization as well as outside partners.”

Mr Stackhouse told the Canadian Press that the Globe could try to charge for access to its online news:

“We think our journalism has a strong value for our users and we think that audience wants to pay for it directly or indirectly and they understand the value of it, so we just need to continue to find ways to make that transaction work,” he said.

“There’s going to be all types of innovations in the years ahead – whether it’s pay-per-use, or pay-per-view or click models – that I think we’d be eager to try out.”

Mr Crawley also said the company is preparing to name a new VP of Information Technology. No replacement for Mr Stackhouse at Report on Business has been announced.