Online journalism eligible for Pulitzers

Interactive graphics, streaming video, and news in database form will all be acceptable as part of entries for the prestigious Pulitzer prizes in journalism.

Last year for the first time, newspaper-style content (text and pictures) that appeared online could be submitted for a Pulitzer.

But now the awards will truly embrace styles of presentation that transcend the printed newspaper, although in most cases they still must be accompanied by printed material.

The changes take affect with the 2007 awards for journalism published this year.

Ferrit becomes shopping site [yawn]

Telecom’s ferrit.co.nz “window shopping” site is now actually a “shopping” site, as Ulrika Hedquist reports at computerworld.co.nz:

Shoppers can now choose how they want to purchase the goods: at the retailer’s store, through the retailer’s website or online at Ferrit.

When an order has been placed, customers can track the delivery status of their goods. When the credit card bill arrives, it will be split out by retailer…

So the only advantage of shopping at ferrit seems to be that you can have one bill for several retailers – if those retailers have chosen to deal with ferrit.

Sorry, still not enough to get me interested. Especially after having to endure those mindless adverts.

APN shares tumble after takeover fails

Sir Tony O’Reilly’s Independent News & Media has failed to meet its own timetable for a takeover of Australian publisher APN, and the deal is off. For now, at least.

APN shares fell more than eight per cent following today’s announcement.

The company, which is Australia’s fourth largest media conglomerate, owns nzherald.co.nz, the New Zealand Herald, and several other newspapers in New Zealand, as well as a share of the country’s biggest radio group, The Radio Network.

INM already owns about 40 per cent of APN and had formed a consortium with the goal of taking full ownership.

APN is rumoured, along with rival Fairfax, to be a takeover target of Australian television broadcaster Seven Network.

Al-Jazeera in New Zealand

Al-Jazeera television is coming to New Zealand – well to Auckland and Wellington, at least – starting tomorrow.

Triangle Television will screen “a selection” of programmes from the recently launched al-Jazeera English service.

Here’s the schedule so far:

ALJAZEERA FROST AROUND THE WORLD: Saturdays at 6pm
ALJAZEERA WITNESS SPECIAL: Sundays at 6am and 11pm
ALJAZEERA INSIDE STORY: weekdays at 2.30pm
ALJAZEERA RIZ KHAN: talkshow Tuesdays to Fridays at 6am

Triangle Television broadcasts on UHF in Auckland and Wellington, although I’ve found the signal very weak in my Auckland suburb.

Then again, you could always watch al-Jazeera online. Dial-up speed video is free, a broadband version costs US$5.95/month.

Flickr unveils camera finder

Photo sharing site Flickr has found a new use for all that user-generated content.

It now analyses the type of camera used to take each picture on the site (assuming the info hasn’t been deleted by the user before uploading) and presents the data in camera popularity rankings.

And, guess what, the camara rankings are linked to Yahoo! Shopping. (Yahoo owns Flickr.)

Venture capitalist and blogger Paul Kedrosky hails this as a savvy use of meta data:

… web services are, among many other things, honey pots for data. Usage of such services throws off wonderfully rich data that is almost certainly of use to someone …

but commenters on his blog raise concerns about data privacy and validity.

I would also suggest that just because a camera is popular with Flickr users doesn’t necessarily mean it’s a superior camera or even superior value.